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Old 08-19-2015, 11:01 AM   #1
619-SWIM-DOG
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JAWS Strikes Again

http://www.ksby.com/story/29828348/s...ta-state-beach

Please all Kayakers stay out of the water it is contaminated with kayak thirsty sharks...........

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Old 08-19-2015, 11:19 AM   #2
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Yikes!!! Glad the kid is OK, that's gotta be scary!!
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Old 08-19-2015, 01:46 PM   #3
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JAWS Strikes Again

Lucky there was a boat near by to assist

If he was out there alone that story could have had a very different ending with nothing to spook the GW away or the boat to get him out of the water.

The bites on the kayak were investigative bites. Sharks don't have hands like we do to check things out. So they use their mouths to investigate things to see if it is something they want to eat.

Unfortunately for us an investigative bite can easily be a fatal one with the amount of damage they cause.

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Old 08-19-2015, 03:04 PM   #4
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shark repellent

What he need is this!




Shark repellent
A shark repellent is any method of driving sharks away from an area. Shark repellents are a category of animal repellents. Shark repellent technologies include magnetic shark repellent, electropositive shark repellents, electrical repellents, and semiochemicals.
Shark repellents can be used to protect people from sharks by driving the sharks away from areas where they are likely to kill human beings. In other applications, they can be used to keep sharks away from areas they may be a danger to themselves due to human activity. In this case, the shark repellent serves as a shark conservation method.
There is evidence that surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate can act as a shark repellent at concentrations on the order of 100 parts per million. However, this does not meet the desired "cloud" deterrence level of 0.1 parts per million.
Research indicates that sharks will avoid an area when they smell chemical released by dead and dying sharks. Six chemicals were synthesized from shark glands and tissues and used in experiments. Sharks immediately reacted once they detected these chemicals. To quote a 2004 Associated Press article, "Fisherman and scientists have long noted sharks stay away if they smell a dead shark."
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Old 08-19-2015, 04:50 PM   #5
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JAWS Strikes Again

My buddy used to wear a shark shield when we dove. It used to crack me up every time. As a diver you already have enough gear, gadgets and other do dads that you need to set up and carry with you. The rest of us would be suited up and in the water waiting for him. It usually took him an additional 20-30 minutes to be ready to dive because of all the extra gear he would carry

I can not confirm nor deny that it actually worked or not since I never saw a shark turn away from him once they got within the 15 feet that it was supposed to work

But I do know we never saw a shark while he was wearing it and we did see them when he was not

I think he paid almost $1k for the unit. Was it worth it? Not in my opinion. But to him it was money well spent for his piece of mind


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Old 08-19-2015, 05:32 PM   #6
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Interesting,,

Last year sometime

I scouted the Gaviota pier early morn,
saw that it was windy/really foggy, and did not launch.

next week

I watched a vid posted by a dude on the pier from that same day I was there.
The vid showed a big white cruising along side the pier.


reading this news article,
it seems to be an attack,
not a exploratory bite

things I also noticed..
yummy yellow
short yak


This attack (as well as Ryan's recent at Vandenberg) adds to my apprehension about fishing there.

still haven't as of yet

damn
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Old 08-19-2015, 05:45 PM   #7
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Short kayaks said to be more enticing? I wasn't familiar with that theory. Something about being seal/sea lion sized?
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Old 08-19-2015, 06:11 PM   #8
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The reason I'm saying it was exploratory is because she didn't come up from the deep at speed and hit the kayak which would have launched him in the air like they do when they attack a seal/sea lion

Either way an attack or exploratory bite from a GW will ruin your day

If not more!




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Old 08-19-2015, 10:18 PM   #9
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Crazy! Look on the bright side, you're 6,000 times more likely to die from obesity and 200 times more likely to get killed by a cop!

http://www.buzzfeed.com/awesomer/20-...ery#.wrkXleGZq
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Old 08-20-2015, 08:20 AM   #10
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That's scarey! I have that same kayak! Luckily it's for my friends to borrow 😁
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Old 08-20-2015, 09:50 AM   #11
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Wether it's yum yum yellow or gobble gobble green I personally don't think the color of your kayak matters much


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Old 08-20-2015, 09:54 AM   #12
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They're probably color blind
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Old 08-20-2015, 10:08 AM   #13
HobieScot
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JAWS Strikes Again

The following was taken from an article on GW's

"It is typical for a great white to swim up to someone at a relaxed pace, take a bite, then swim off," said Collier. This contrasts with the torpedo-like attacks on the seal, suggesting that the shark's goal is not predation.

Teeth Like Hands

"Great whites are curious and investigative animals," said Martin. "That's what most people don't realize. When great whites bite something unfamiliar to them, whether a person or a crab pot, they're looking for tactile evidence about what it is."

A great white uses its teeth the way humans use their hands. In a living shark, every tooth has ten to fifteen degrees of flex. When the animal opens its mouth, the tooth bed is pulled back, "causing their teeth to splay out like a cat's whiskers," said Martin.

"Combine that with the flexibility of each tooth, and you realize a great white can use its jaws like a pair of forceps. They're very adept at grabbing things that snag their curiosity."

Great whites are also sharp sighted, further evidence that they do not mistake humans for other prey. Scientists believe that sharks see as well below the surface as humans do above it. And they see in color.

"I've seen these sharks swim 70 feet (21 meters) to the surface to investigate a piece of debris no bigger than the palm of my hand," said Martin. They are also known to take bites of buoys, paddle boards, kayaks, zodiac boats, and other man-made objects floating in the ocean.

"Everyone wants to think sharks just search out seals, but they bite a lot of things that don't resemble any of their known prey," said A. Peter Klimley, an expert in marine animal behavior at the University of California, Davis, and author of the Secret Lives of Sharks and co-author of Great White Sharks: The Biology of Carcharodon carcharias. "They don't tear these things to pieces. They take a bite, feel them over, then move on."


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