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Old 06-28-2017, 08:28 PM   #1
jbl_91762
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Securing gear for surf launch?

Will be my first time launching in surf this coming Sunday at LJ. Questions about stowing in prep for possible roll over. I have an 2016 Outback so have 4 rod holders. Only bringing 2 rods with leashes so should I place them in rear or lay down on side?? Bait tank is strapped down good and wont go nowhere. Paddle and Gaff on each side using stock straps. But how do you guys secure your Mirage Drive?? Other stuff will be in hatches. Thanks for help.
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Old 06-28-2017, 09:29 PM   #2
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A few thoughts come to mind:

I put poles & gaff in one bundle on one side (easier to jump out the other side without things in the way.) I always stow that bundle flat and strapped to my kayak front and back. Put the point protector on your gaff. If you roll and everything flies asunder, you don't want to get gaffed or hooked in the process. Eye patches look cool on pirates, but I don't want one myself. It's a bitch pulling hooks out after they dig in past the barb. If you have a beautiful fish on your kayak you want to keep, tie it down.

If you wear glasses, get a neck strap so you don't lose your glasses in the surf. Tighten the chin strap on your favorite fishing hat, but also consider the possibility of choking on the strap. If you have a knife around your neck, it might be a good idea to put it in a hatch so you don't stab yourself. I had a flight instructor who once crashed upon landing and impaled himself with a ball point pen in his pocket.

If your fish finder is vulnerable, tighten it down flat, or stow it in a hatch.

I cut off old hooks and rigs and stow them in my hatch bucket before I land. Rigs I prepare the night before have foam squares on all the hooks and they are wrapped up within the bundle, or they are in ziploc bags in my hatch bucket ready to tie to the swivels.

I empty my bait tank and if there is any water in my hull I pump that out to avoid unnecessary weight and mass. Lighter is more maneuverable.

If you roll, don't get between your kayak and shore. You don't want to get smashed by your kayak being pushed by a crashing wave. Grab the back back of your kayak to control and straighten it out, not the front. Let the physics work for you rather than against you.

Anything you want to keep should be tied down or stowed inside a hatch. When I land, my paddle is across my lap so I can use it to steer or brake to stay straight. I latch my pedals in the UP position with the bungee, and I pull my rudder up. Since your bait tank is strapped down and empty, you can throw small items in that.

If you are about ready to get broad-sided by a wave, lean into the wave. Hopefully, your kayak will lift and the wave will pass under you. If you let the kayak lean the direction of the wave, it's easy to roll.

Even small waves can have more energy than you expect if you are in an ackward position. Personally, I think it's always better to be prepared even if the landing looks easy.

The results of capsizing in the waves is called a yard sale for good reason


If you haven't seen it yet, check out this thread from about 10 days ago:
http://www.bigwatersedge.com/bwevb/s...ad.php?t=31353

As he suggests from his experience, It's good to carry a wire cutter capable of cutting hooks. It's easier to cut a hook and push it out the other side than to try to back it up.

Watch the surf forecasts for La Jolla Shores. If it's too much for your level of comfort, launch out of Mission Bay or fish in San Diego Bay.

That's all I can think of for now. On a nice day it's pretty easy. I think everyone has crashed at least once. That's part of the learning process.
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Old 06-29-2017, 01:04 PM   #3
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I have a different kayak but I'd say 75%of the time my rods are lashed down flat along my gunnels. They only stay up if there is literally no surf.

I always cut hooks and weights off before heading in. Gaff gets secured front and back. Bait tank usually emptied of water. I do NOT leash my paddle until I'm safely in open water. I don't like rope or cord of any sort potentially looping me to the yak. Plus this way I usually hold on to the paddle.

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Old 06-29-2017, 02:32 PM   #4
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I have a smaller kayak (Stealth 9) and am often launching into bigger surf than the usual knee rollers at La Jolla so ALWAYS take my reels off, put them in dry storage, and then bungie my rods to the side of my kayak. More of a hassle to get set up out there but less damage to the reels and not worried about snapping in rods due to flipping. I saw some guys coming in a couple weeks ago at La Jolla and the waves were not nonexistent but they also weren't anything crazy. Watched both guys flip and the guy who didn't bungie/store his rod had 3-4 broken rods when he flipped his kayak back over. NOT a fun way to end your day...
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Old 06-29-2017, 03:13 PM   #5
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strap them to the side of your kayak and if you flip the only thing you'll lose is your hat


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Old 06-29-2017, 03:57 PM   #6
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strap them to the side of your kayak and if you flip the only thing you'll is your hat
What was he doing? Launching or landing? I feel like he was just sitting there waiting to get his *** kicked......
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Old 06-29-2017, 03:59 PM   #7
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What was he doing? Launching or landing? I feel like he was just sitting there waiting to get his *** kicked......

He is I and I is He.

The size of the surf in the video is a bit deceiving but I will tell you this much, there was a story published about the other guys that made it out and had to land in surf that made what's on the video look like a flat day in LJ.
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Old 06-29-2017, 04:05 PM   #8
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Found it

http://www.kayakfishmag.com/features/team-sewer/

Team Sewer, Seabass And 10-Foot Surf

What could go wrong?

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments




Team Sewer, Seabass and 10-foot Surf
What could go wrong?
By Tony Park

It’s early, pitch dark at a famous surf beach a few miles west of Malibu. Team Sewer—that’s me, Greg Andrew, Stinky Matt, Roby, and Minh—is chasing a hot rumor. They’re out there, beyond the breakers: broom tails going 50 pounds or even bigger. We are sick with white seabass fever.

The surf is crashing. We can’t see what we’re up against, but I can hear it. It sounds intimidating.

No pain no gain, I figure as Greg and I push off into the darkness. The breakers are big, larger than I imagined, overhead. Wait … wait … paddle like crazy! I take a big one to the face. Straighten out, here comes the next one. SLAM. I’m spitting water and considering a new hobby. I’m starting to doubt we’ll make it when Greg finally crawls past the kill zone.

I turn on my radio to learn if the other guys made it. Not so much. Stinky Matt flipped. Minh broke a paddle and busted on home. Oh well, let’s go fish.


We find the beds of spawning squid, seabass chow. Hook up! It’s a long, skinny snaggle-toothed fish, a barracuda and large for its kind, a log. More follow, stacks of cordwood, but the seabass we hunger for never show.

Buttchaser John paddles up, undaunted. On his first drop, he connects with his namesake, a huge halibut that will later peg a scale at 40 pounds. Scratch one flatty!

Time to go. Surfers are stacked outside, catching rides on huge swells. No pain no gain, again. I’m chasing a giant set toward the beach when my momentum slows. I’m sucked back. A 10-footer rears behind me. Crap!
You can brace into a wave no matter how big, or so they say. I turn broadside and tuck in, leaning as far as I can into the freight train crashing on my head. Everything goes black.

I’m underwater in waders and no lifejacket in huge surf. I can’t touch bottom. Waves pound me one after the other. I’m screwed, but manage to swim up for a breath. An eternity later, I feel sand beneath my feet.

My kayak is there in the slosh, upside down. I’m missing a rod, a Calstar 800M with a Daiwa Saltiga 30T, worth a cool $1,000. Another kayak washes in, with Roby’s bait-tank bobbing behind. Buttchaser John’s kayak follows, topsy-turvy. But not Greg Andrews’. He slides his in perfectly like there’s no surf at all. Back at the truck, we total the damage. An old phone, some rod leashes, a rudder, my Calstar. Team Sewer is out $2,500 in gear. Stupid white seabass.

When it comes to seabass, to this day nothing stops Team Sewer from paddling out—they’ll fish anywhere. They burn with the fever. Author Tony Park readily admits he wouldn’t have swallowed so much seawater if he’d worn his PFD during his crash landing. “Maybe someday I’ll learn my lesson, but not yet,” he says with a laugh.
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Old 06-29-2017, 04:45 PM   #9
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What was he doing? Launching or landing? I feel like he was just sitting there waiting to get his *** kicked......
He was probably waiting for the lull. When I surf launch, the biggest hindering event of the day is the launch and landing. I can go out on my own at night and what not. No fear of anything like sharks or mystical creatures but I do fear losing or damaging gear. After learning a few costly lessons here and there I now take my time when launching.
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Old 06-29-2017, 06:53 PM   #10
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Sewer Crew

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Originally Posted by jorluivil View Post
Found it

http://www.kayakfishmag.com/features/team-sewer/

Team Sewer, Seabass And 10-Foot Surf

What could go wrong?

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 // 0 Comments




Team Sewer, Seabass and 10-foot Surf
What could go wrong?
By Tony Park

It’s early, pitch dark at a famous surf beach a few miles west of Malibu. Team Sewer—that’s me, Greg Andrew, Stinky Matt, Roby, and Minh—is chasing a hot rumor. They’re out there, beyond the breakers: broom tails going 50 pounds or even bigger. We are sick with white seabass fever.

The surf is crashing. We can’t see what we’re up against, but I can hear it. It sounds intimidating.

No pain no gain, I figure as Greg and I push off into the darkness. The breakers are big, larger than I imagined, overhead. Wait … wait … paddle like crazy! I take a big one to the face. Straighten out, here comes the next one. SLAM. I’m spitting water and considering a new hobby. I’m starting to doubt we’ll make it when Greg finally crawls past the kill zone.

I turn on my radio to learn if the other guys made it. Not so much. Stinky Matt flipped. Minh broke a paddle and busted on home. Oh well, let’s go fish.


We find the beds of spawning squid, seabass chow. Hook up! It’s a long, skinny snaggle-toothed fish, a barracuda and large for its kind, a log. More follow, stacks of cordwood, but the seabass we hunger for never show.

Buttchaser John paddles up, undaunted. On his first drop, he connects with his namesake, a huge halibut that will later peg a scale at 40 pounds. Scratch one flatty!

Time to go. Surfers are stacked outside, catching rides on huge swells. No pain no gain, again. I’m chasing a giant set toward the beach when my momentum slows. I’m sucked back. A 10-footer rears behind me. Crap!
You can brace into a wave no matter how big, or so they say. I turn broadside and tuck in, leaning as far as I can into the freight train crashing on my head. Everything goes black.

I’m underwater in waders and no lifejacket in huge surf. I can’t touch bottom. Waves pound me one after the other. I’m screwed, but manage to swim up for a breath. An eternity later, I feel sand beneath my feet.

My kayak is there in the slosh, upside down. I’m missing a rod, a Calstar 800M with a Daiwa Saltiga 30T, worth a cool $1,000. Another kayak washes in, with Roby’s bait-tank bobbing behind. Buttchaser John’s kayak follows, topsy-turvy. But not Greg Andrews’. He slides his in perfectly like there’s no surf at all. Back at the truck, we total the damage. An old phone, some rod leashes, a rudder, my Calstar. Team Sewer is out $2,500 in gear. Stupid white seabass.

When it comes to seabass, to this day nothing stops Team Sewer from paddling out—they’ll fish anywhere. They burn with the fever. Author Tony Park readily admits he wouldn’t have swallowed so much seawater if he’d worn his PFD during his crash landing. “Maybe someday I’ll learn my lesson, but not yet,” he says with a laugh.
Wish them squid would thicken up over here again.
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Old 06-29-2017, 06:55 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jorluivil View Post
He is I and I is He.

The size of the surf in the video is a bit deceiving but I will tell you this much, there was a story published about the other guys that made it out and had to land in surf that made what's on the video look like a flat day in LJ.
Go pro does it no justice.
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Old 06-29-2017, 07:05 PM   #12
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It is possible to

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Originally Posted by jbl_91762 View Post
Will be my first time launching in surf this coming Sunday at LJ. Questions about stowing in prep for possible roll over. I have an 2016 Outback so have 4 rod holders. Only bringing 2 rods with leashes so should I place them in rear or lay down on side?? Bait tank is strapped down good and wont go nowhere. Paddle and Gaff on each side using stock straps. But how do you guys secure your Mirage Drive?? Other stuff will be in hatches. Thanks for help.
Get 7 footers in front hatch with the reels on. You need to twist the rod when you get to the reel . When you only have the butt of rod remaining you have to try and flex the rod with a good amount of pressure. If nothing else, place reels in dry bag. Do yourself a favor. Spend 100$- 120$ On some Hobie leashes at 20$ a pop. Well worth investment in comparison to a new drive or rod and reel.
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Old 06-29-2017, 08:28 PM   #13
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Get 7 footers in front hatch with the reels on. You need to twist the rod when you get to the reel . When you only have the butt of rod remaining you have to try and flex the rod with a good amount of pressure. If nothing else, place reels in dry bag. Do yourself a favor. Spend 100$- 120$ On some Hobie leashes at 20$ a pop. Well worth investment in comparison to a new drive or rod and reel.
Yup, I almost always use a dry bag for reels. Sand is no bueno
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Old 06-29-2017, 09:00 PM   #14
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Sound advice I really appreciate it gents!!

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Get 7 footers in front hatch with the reels on. You need to twist the rod when you get to the reel . When you only have the butt of rod remaining you have to try and flex the rod with a good amount of pressure. If nothing else, place reels in dry bag. Do yourself a favor. Spend 100$- 120$ On some Hobie leashes at 20$ a pop. Well worth investment in comparison to a new drive or rod and reel.
I see under the center hatch there is foam blocks in front and rear, so if I take those out are they there for floor support or buoyancy?? I will practice trying to stow my 7' rods from front and secure the reels also.
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Old 06-30-2017, 07:49 AM   #15
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Sound advice I really appreciate it gents!!



I see under the center hatch there is foam blocks in front and rear, so if I take those out are they there for floor support or buoyancy?? I will practice trying to stow my 7' rods from front and secure the reels also.
Those as support for the deck. Take me out and you will get premature cracks
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Old 06-30-2017, 07:52 AM   #16
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Those as support for the deck. Take me out and you will get premature cracks
That's what I thought they were thanks. Love the Yak but IMO stupid design flaw if you need foam to support floor.
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Old 06-30-2017, 08:40 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by jorluivil View Post
He is I and I is He...
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTboosted View Post
He was probably waiting for the lull. When I surf launch, the biggest hindering event of the day is the launch and landing. I can go out on my own at night and what not. No fear of anything like sharks or mystical creatures but I do fear losing or damaging gear. After learning a few costly lessons here and there I now take my time when launching.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TJones View Post
Go pro does it no justice.
10-4. I've only been through the surf once so I really dont know what a bad day looks like. My first launch and landing was full of anxiety and visions of failure/lost gear. Everything went ok that day, but im sure I'll have that experience eventually...

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Old 06-30-2017, 10:54 PM   #18
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So are guys just using bungee to strap rods to the side of kayaks? I just bought a thresher 140 and it's supposed to be able to store rods internally but I felt like I was going to jack up my rods trying to bend them to fit. I wasn't planning on taking reels off every trip but if that's what's recommended I'll do it. Trying to make sure I learn from others mistakes so I don't make the same ones first trip out. Any advise for rod storage durning launch and landing would be great. Cheers


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Old 07-01-2017, 01:53 PM   #19
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I think bungees work better than nothing in mild conditions if your kayak doesn't roll or crash. There can be a lot of force in a crashing wave.

I was hit by an unexpected wave on a rough day not long ago during landing.

My poles/gaff bundle was lashed tightly to two single piece Hobie rod extenders, front and back. I thought these would be secure lash points and they keep my bundle nicely out of the way on the right side gunwale.



The back rod extender stayed in place, while the front rod extender was pulled out and disappeared in the surf. The the bundle lashing was gone with it.

Proverbially speaking, sh*t happens.

The kayak did not roll, but it got smashed pretty hard by a wave coming down on top of me. Because of my position to the wave, I rolled off the side of the bundle into the wave and I was behind the kayak scrambling to grab everything. Thankfully, my bundle of rods were still kind of tethered together dangling off the back rod holder. Nothing broke. All I lost was the rod holder.

Lucky again

----

For lashing bundles, I discovered something that works pretty good in place of a bungee:

I took an old t-shirt and cut it into strips lengthwise, about 1-1.5" wide. The fabric automatically curls into cords that have enough stretch to hold a bundle of rods together nicely. It ties and unties easily when it's wet or dry, and simple overhand knots hold well because of the stretch tension. Because of the way it stretches to conform to the bundle, I like it better than Velcro strips that I used previously. My t-shirt strip lashing cords have proven to be multi-purpose, so I usually have a few extras in my kayak as backup to those I use for tying my gear down.
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